Sir John Hill

Size: ~10 x 16 inches - Original Hand Colored Copperplate Engravings
Please scroll down for bibliographic information

Eden
Marygold, Protea
Date: 1757
Price: $725
Print Code: Bohil007

Eden
Tulip, Lady's Slipper
Date: 1757
Price: $750
Print Code: Bohil026

Eden
Hyacinth, Daffodil
Date: 1757
Price: $750
Print Code: Bohil028

Eden
Tulips
Date: 1757
Price: $950
Print Code: Bohil034

Eden
Fritillary
Date: 1757
Price: $725
Print Code: Bohil035

Eden
Lilly, Narcissus, etc.
Date: 1757
Price: $950
Print Code: Bohil037

Eden
Tulip, Peony
Date: 1757
Price: $950
Print Code: Bohil038

Eden
Martagon, Iris, etc.
Date: 1757
Price: $725
Print Code: Bohil042

Eden
Crown Imperial, etc.
Date: 1757
Price: $725
Print Code: Bohil043

Eden
Iris, Amaryllis, etc.
Date: 1757
Price: $725
Print Code: Bohil044

Eden
Sunflower, Rose, etc.
Date: 1757
Price: $825
Print Code: Bohil045

Eden
Rose, Iris, etc.
Date: 1757
Price: $725
Print Code: Bohil046

Eden
Lilly, Lavatera, etc.
Date: 1757
Price: $625
Print Code: Bohil051

Eden
Lilly, Martagon
Date: 1757
Price: $725
Print Code: Bohil054

Eden
Aster, Hollyhock
Date: 1757
Price: $675
Print Code: Bohil055

Eden
Tulip, Fritillary
Date: 1757
Price: $750
Print Code: Bohil056

These magnificent and extremely rare hand colored copperplate engravings have been selected from a British work entitled Eden: or A Compleat Body of Gardening Containing plain and familiar directions for raising the several useful products of a garden, fruits, roots, and herbage; from the practice of the most successful gardeners, and the result of long experience... Compiled and digested from the papers of the late celebrated Mr. Hale, by the authors of the Compleat Body of Husbandry, published in 1757 in London.

Hill borrowed heavily from previous works for the illustrations in Eden. Many of them are in fact copies from Hortus Floridus by Crispijn van de Passe and Parkinson's Paradisi in sole. Still, "in the opinion of Fussell, II 37, the plates are 'very fine'."

Most likely born in Peterborough in 1716, Sir John Hill was a versatile and productive Englishman who was primarily renowned for introducing the Linnaean system of classification to England.

Hill first began studying botany after completing an apprenticeship as an apothecary, and he was soon commissioned to organize the dried plant collection and gardens of the Duke of Richmond and Lord Petre.
Hill first began studying botany after completing an apprenticeship as an apothecary, and he was soon commissioned to organize the dried plant collection and gardens of the Duke of Richmond and Lord Petre.
Among many other positions both botanical and otherwise, John Hill was a botanical advisor to the Princess Dowager of Wales who founded the Kew botanic garden in 1759.

The gardens there, "arranged according to the Linnaean 'sexual system' classification" encouraged the change in how plants were named and classified. Hill's contribution to this most have been quite worthy. While he is noted as being an "entertaining and quarrelsome but talented character" (Hunt), he is also considered "a somewhat controversial figure in the history of botany in England" (An Oak Spring Flora). In 1760, he was the first to make consistent English use of Linnaean binomials in his Flora Britannica, and his The Vegetable System (1759-1775) won him the Order of Vasa by the King of Sweden in 1774.

Cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p.100; cf. Henrey III. 776; cf. Hunt 559; cf. Nissen BBI 880; cf. Tongiorgi Tomasi An Oak Spring Flora 53 (second edition)